Archive for skin cancer

The 411 on Cancer Immunotherapy

 

One of the most promising areas in cancer research and precision medicine today is “Immunotherapy.  Credited as the first therapy ever proven to extend the lives of patients with metastatic melanoma, immunotherapy is changing the way some cancers are treated.

 

Here’s the dealio (as my daughter always says)…  Immunotherapy refers to a class of treatments that use the body’s own immune system to help fight cancer.  Some treatments boost the body’s immune system in a very general way, while others help train the immune system to attack cancer cells specifically.  Today, most people who receive immunotherapy have cancers that are advanced. Their cancers have either recurred and spread after primary treatment, or were diagnosed in an advanced stage.  Often times, patients receiving immunotherapy treatments are enrolled in a clinical trial.

 

Because immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field, understanding the “basics”  can be complicated and confusing.  One of the best resources I’ve found to help explain the complexities of immunotherapy is the Cancer Support Community’s  new program… Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Your Immune System & Cancer Treatment.  

 

Additionally, the Cancer Support Community is hosting several FREE webinars on immunotherapy for patients diagnosed with melanoma, leukemia, lymphoma and lung cancers.  “Immunotherapy Advances in Melanoma” is scheduled for September 9, 2014 at 6:30pm EST.

 

Other fantastic resources on immunotherapy include:

Cancer Research Institute

The Cancer Research Institute (CRI) is dedicated to advancing the immune system’s power to conquer all cancers. Click HERE to see brief statistics on specific cancers as well as an overview of the current and potential impact of immunotherapy for each cancer type. All content on this site has been reviewed and verified by experts in cancer immunotherapy.

 

TheAnswerToCancer.org

Great informational site for patients and caregivers who are interested in learning more about cancer immunotherapy as a treatment option.  Hear firsthand from patients who have benefitted from this novel approach to cancer treatment.  

 

Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Finder  

Many patients are not aware of opportunities to participate in clinical trials and may find it difficult to identify trials that may be appropriate for them.  The Cancer Research Institute has partnered with EmergingMed to provide the Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Finder, a tool designed to help patients quickly search for clinical trials that match their specific cancer diagnosis and treatment history.  

The Cancer Research Institute also has Clinical Trial Navigators available Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. EST who can help you find personalized trial matches, connect with study sites, and answer many of your questions.  Simply call (toll-free) 1-855-216-0127.  This service is free and completely confidential.  

 

Lazarex Cancer Foundation  

If you need help navigating clinical trial options or financial assistance to attend a clinical trial, connect with Lazarex Cancer Foundation.  Lazarex can help with the costs associated with participating in a clinical trial, including:

  • Transportation (airfare, gas, rental cars, taxi fare, parking/tolls)
  • Lodging (short- and long-term housing)
  • Certain medical expenses not covered by insurance and necessary for clinical trial treatment.

 

A Brief History of Immunotherapy

In case you’re interested, Targeted Oncology (fantastic site for the latest news and insights from leading researchers and cancer centers) has a great article on the history of immunotherapy which dates back to the late 19th century.

 

Make sure to discuss any findings with your doctors and health care team.  Knowledge is power…

 

FREE Running Program for Cancer Survivors in MD, DC, VA, NY & Chicago

Andy & Alan 2004 Bay Bridge 10K

Andy & Alan @ Rockville Rotary Twilighter 8K Runfest 1992

 

Pictured above is my husband Alan (on the right) with his childhood friend Andy.  Since this picture was taken, Andy has run more than 30 marathons, completed 13 triathlons and has become a certified running coach.  Despite all these accomplishments, Andy always made time to go for a run or walk with Alan, even after he was diagnosed with cancer.

 

It was no surprise to me that Andy connected with The Ulman Cancer Fund’s CANCER to 5K Training Program - a FREE 12-week training program designed to introduce or reintroduce cancer survivors to training for and completing a 5K road race.  Amazing, right?!

ABOUT The CANCER to 5K Training Program:

Research has now shown that exercise is especially important for cancer survivors both in and out of active treatment.  Regular exercise not only improves mood, boosts self-confidence and reduces fatigue, but there is loads of evidence suggesting that higher levels of physical activity can help keep the cancer from recurring.

 

The Cancer to 5K Training Program is a progressive run/walk program designed to get cancer survivors to the 5K finish-line happy, healthy and injury-free.  

*  Who can join?  Cancer to 5K is open to any cancer survivor regardless of age, location, treatment status or fitness level.  Survivors who have completed treatment as well as survivors who are currently undergoing treatment can participate.

*  Where is training held?  If you live in the following areas, certified running coaches and experienced volunteer runners (aka “Sherpas”) will help train you in a small group setting.  Each 12-week session is limited to 10 participants.  Click HERE for exact locations in:

      • Washington DC/Northern Virginia
      • Montgomery County Maryland
      • Howard County, Maryland
      • Baltimore, Maryland
      • New York, NY
      • Chicago, IL.

* What if you live elsewhere?  If you live outside the current group training areas, you can still participate with The CANCER to 5K “At Home” Training Program.  As a Cancer to 5K “At Home” participant, you will receive one-on-one coaching with a Cancer to 5K coach. Workouts will be sent to you via email, and you will have access to your coach via email and phone.

Registration for the fall training season is now OPEN!  
Group workouts will begin in August 2014.
“At-Home” participants can begin training anytime.

 

For more information, contact Program Manager Laura Scruggs via email at laura@ulmanfund.org  or via 410.964.0202 x108.  

Please note:  A medical waiver must be signed by the participant’s current primary care physician to ensure that training for a 5K won’t negatively impact treatment or recovery.

 

Financial Assistance from Walk In My Shoes Cancer Foundation

 

 

If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and are having a hard time making ends meet, check out the Walk In My Shoes Foundation.

Walk In My Shoes Foundation assists cancer patients with paying rent, mortgages, utility bills, medication, purchasing gas cards, buying groceries, etc.  To qualify for assistance, which is based on availability, the following guidelines have been set:

  • Only patients undergoing cancer treatment are eligible for assistance.
  • Only bills in patient’s name are eligible for payment.
  • Maximum assistance is $500.00 per patient per calendar year.
  • First come first serve basis.
  • No income guidelines.
  • Men, women, children are welcome to apply regardless of type of cancer.
  • Cash will not be disbursed.

To apply, please complete the form on the Walk In My Shoes Foundation CONTACT US page or email them directly at info@walkinmyshoesfoundation.com.  Someone should contact you within 48 hours.

Personalizing YOUR Cancer Treatment (part 4): Do you know your cancer biomarkers?

Personalized-Medicine

In the near future, instead of saying, “I have breast cancer,” a patient will say something like , “I have a HER2-positive carcinoma with a KRAS mutation.”  Cancer will be defined by it’s own unique molecular profile and biomarkers rather than the body part where it originated.

To learn more about the dozens of biomarkers already being used to guide cancer treatment, check out the table below. Please note: there are thousands of known biomarkers without currently known effectiveness or relevance to cancer care. This table only represents the biomarkers that are currently known to be significant in informing cancer care today.*

Biomarker About Cancers that may benefit from testing Treatments associated with response or lack of response/resistance*
ALK anaplastic lymphoma kinase, an enzyme that can form a oncogenic fusion gene with EML4 lung (non-small cell), lymphoma (anaplastic large-cell), nervous system (familial neuroblastoma) crizotinib (Xalkori®), pemetrexed (Alimta®)
AR androgen receptor, part of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, active in cell signaling and therefore cell multiplication and growth prostate, breast, ovarian, bladder, lung (non-small cell) bicalutamide (Casodex®), flutamide (Eulexin®), goserelin (Zoladex®), leuprolide (Lupron®), abarelix (Plenaxis®), gonadorelin (Factrel®)
BRAF also know as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1, a proto-oncogene in the RAF/MIL family of molecules active in MAP/ERK cell signaling, promotes cell multiplication and growth colon, skin (melanoma), lung (adenocarcinoma), thyroid (papillary thyroid carcinoma), nervous system (pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas with and without anaplasia) cetuximab (Erbitux®), panitumumab (Vectibix®), vemurafenib (Zelboraf®)
BRCA1 a so-called “breast cancer gene”, its expression in many cancers can indicate potential response to certain types of therapies lung, ovarian cisplatin (Platinol®)
c-Kit cytokine receptor also know as CD117, a proto-oncogene that interacts with cell growth factors, plays a roll in cell survival, multiplication and differentiation GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumor), skin (melanoma), blood (acute myelogenous leukemia) imatinib (Gleevec®), sorafenib (Nexavar®), sunitinib (Sutent®)
c-MET also known as MET (mesenchymal epithelial transition factor) or HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), a proto-oncogene active in cell signaling, promotes cancer cell growth and multiplication lung (non-small cell), ovarian erlotinib (Tarceva®), gefitinib (Iressa®)
COX-2 cyclooxygenase-2, also known as protaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important to creation of prostaglandins, which are messenger molecules that play a role in many cancers lung (non-small cell) celecoxib (Celebrex®)
EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor, also known as ErbB-1 or HER1, a receptor tyrosine kinase active in cell signaling, promotes cell growth and multiplication lung (non-small cell) cetuximab (Erbitux®), erlotinib (Tarceva®), gefitinib (Iressa®), panitumumab (Vectibix®)
EGFR secondary mutation (T790 M) a mutation of the EGFR gene associated with acquired resistance to certain treatments lung (non-small cell), colorectal, head and neck resistance to erlotinib (Tarceva®), gefitinib (Iressa®)
ER estrogen receptor, part of the nuclear hormone family of intracellular receptors, active in cell multiplication breast, ovarian, female genital tract cancer anastrazole (Arimidex®), exemestane (Aromasin®), letrozole (Femara®), tamoxifen (Nolvadex®), megestrol acetate (Megace®, Megace® ES), fulvestrant (Faslodex®), toremifene (Fareston®), medroxyprogesterone, (Provera®, Amen®, Curretab®, Cycrin®), goserelin (Zoladex®), leuprolide (Eligard®, Lupron®, Viadur®)
ERCC1 excision repair cross-complementation group 1, an enzyme active in DNA repair and therefore a sign of resistance to treatments that work by disrupting tumor DNA lung (non-small cell and small cell), gastric, ovarian, colorectal, bladder resistance to cisplatin (Platinol®), carboplatin (Paraplatin®), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin®)
HER2 human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, also known as HER2/neu or ErbB-2, a receptor tyrosine kinase active in cell signaling, promotes cell growth and multiplication breast, gastroesophageal, gastric, ovarian, colorectal lapatinib (Tykerb®), trastuzumab (Herceptin®), doxorubicin (Adriamycin®, Rubex®), liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx®, Myocet®), epirubicin (Ellence®)
KRAS proto-oncogene of the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, active in cell signaling in the EGFR pathway, promotes cell growth and multiplication lung (non-small cell), colon, pancreatic cetuximab (Erbitux®), erlotinib (Tarceva®), gefitinib (Iressa®), panitumumab (Vectibix®)
MGMT O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase is a gene that encodes a DNA repair enzyme, loss of MGMT may play a role in cancer formation, MGMT can also interfere with treatments that work by disrupting tumor DNA breast, lung (non-small cell), esophageal, brain (glioblastoma multiforme, oligodendrogliomas), skin (melanoma), pituitary gland (carcinoma) lack of response to temozolomide (Temodar®)
MRP1 multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, an ATP-dependent transmembrane drug efflux pump associated with resistance to many drugs breast, lymphoma, head and neck lack of response to anthracyclines such as doxorubicin (Adrimycin®), vinca alkaloids, and methotrexate (Trexall®)
PGP p-glycoprotein, also known as P-gp, an ATP-dependent transmembrane drug efflux pump associated with acquired resistance to many drugs breast, ovarian, lymphoma, head and neck lack of response to anthracylines such as doxorubicin (Adriamycin®), epirubicin (Ellence®) and liposomal-doxorubicin (Doxil®), and other drugs such as paclitaxel (Taxol®), docetaxel (Taxotere®), vinblastine (Velban®), vincristine (Oncovin®), vinorelbine (Navelbine®)
PIK3CA a specific mutation within the PI3 (phosphoinositide 3) kinase pathway or a gene copy number variation, aberrations along the PI3K pathway are associated with many cancers colorectal, brain (glioblastoma), gastric, breast, lung, ovarian lapatinib (Tykerb®); resistance to cetuximab (Erbitux®), panitumumab (Vectibix); decreased response to trastuzumab (Herceptin®)
PR progesterone receptor, also called PGR, part of the nuclear hormone family of intracellular receptors, active in cell multiplication breast, ovarian, female genital tract cancer letrozole (Femara®), tamoxifen (Nolvadex®), fulvestrant (Faslodex®), toremifene (Fareston®), exemestane (Aromasin®), anastrozole (Arimidex®), goserelin (Zoladex®), gonadorelin (Factrel®), leuprolide (Eligard®, Lupron®, Viadur®), medroxyprogesterone (Provera®, Amen®, Curretab®, Cycrin®), megestrol acetate (Megace®, Megace® ES)
PTEN phosphatase and tensin homolog, a tumor suppressor active in EGFR, HER2 and AKT cell signaling pathways breast, colon, lung (non-small cell), brain (glioblastoma), head and neck low expression associated with lack of response to cetuximab (Erbitux®), gefitinib (Iressa®), trastuzumab (Herceptin®), panitumumab (Vectibix®), erlotinib (Tarceva®)
RRM1 ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1, an enzyme required for DNA synthesis from RNA and therefore can interfere with treatments that work by disrupting RNA activity lung (non-small cell), pancreatic high expression associated with lack of response to gemcitabine (Gemzar®), hydroxyurea (Hydrea®, Droxia®)
SPARC secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine, a protein active in tumor growth and spreading skin (melanoma), breast, gastric, pancreatic, head and neck albumin-bound paclitaxel/nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane®)
TLE3 a member of the transducin-like enhancer of split family of proteins, implicated in creation of tumors breast, ovarian taxane therapy such as paclitaxel (Taxol®), docetaxel (Taxotere ®)
TOPO2A topoisomerase IIA, an enzyme active in DNA synthesis and repair breast, colon, ovarian, lung (small cell) doxorubicin (Adriamycin®), epirubicin (Ellence®, Pharmorubucin®), liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx®, Myocet®)
TS thymidylate synthetase, an enzyme active in DNA synthesis and repair, can be inhibited by certain compounds breast, colon, gastric, head and neck, liver, pancreatic, lung (non-small cell) lack of response to 5-fluorouracil (Adrucil®), cytarabine (Cytosar-U®), pemetrexed (Alimta®)
TUBB3 Class III -tubulin, protein found in microtubules which are important cell structures ovarian, lung (non-small cell) taxanes such as paclitaxel (Taxol®), docetaxel (Taxotere ®), vinca alkaloids such as vinorelbine (Navelbine®)

* Biomarker status (overexpressed, underexpressed, positive or negative for specific mutations, etc.) determines whether that biomarker is associated with response, lack of response or resistance to each treatment. Treatment associations are from published, peer-reviewed medical literature. Citations available upon request. Only your doctor can decide which treatments are appropriate for you.

**Got questions about YOUR biomarkers, e-mail PatientNavigator@carisls.com.  A Patient Navigator who is well versed in molecular profiling and biomarkers will answer your questions.  (this is a FREE service provided by Caris Life Sciences.) 

*** Source:  MyCancer.com (an educational resource sponsored by Caris Life Sciences®) is a fantastic website for cancer patients and their caregivers that provides information about personalizing your cancer treatment using molecular profiling and cancer biomarkers.

Adult Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: Get the 411 on Late Effects of Cancer Treatments

 

Thanks to advances in early detection and better treatment regimens, survivors of childhood cancers often go on to live full and productive lives.  However, the same treatments that cure cancer can also put survivors at risk for future medical problems.  Such health problems, known as “late effects“, can occur months or years or even decades after successful treatment has ended.   

FACT:  In a large study of adult survivors of childhood cancer, researchers have found that more than 95% suffered from a chronic health condition by the age of 45, including pulmonary, hearing, cardiac and other problems related either to their cancer or the cancer treatment.

FACT:  The chances of having late effects increases over time so the older you get, the more likely you are to experience health problems.  Risk factors vary depending type of cancer originally treated, location & size of tumor(s), treatment regimens utilized as well as other patient-related factors.

FACT:  Survivors need proactive, clinical health screenings and ongoing, specialized follow up care. Regular follow-up by health professionals who are experts in finding and treating late effects is key.  The exams should be done by a health professional who is both familiar with the survivor’s risk for late effects and can recognize the early signs of late effects.

 

If you are an adult survivor of pediatric cancer, take a look at these RESOURCES that focus on late effects of cancer treatments:  

* Survivors Taking Action & Responsibility (STAR) program at the Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University is a comprehensive long-term follow-up program specifically created for adult survivors of pediatric cancer.   STAR is one of several programs in the country to offer this specialized service.  Here, annual check ups are tailored to each patient and may include a heart ultrasound, a battery of blood tests, a mammogram, a chest MRI, a session with a counselor as well as many other diagnostic tools.

I also LOVE their GET EMPOWERED: A video education series for childhood cancer patients and survivors.  Topics include the impact of childhood cancer on adult survivors, making the transition to adult health care, cardiac risk factors, fertility, finding a “new normal” and navigating the emotional side of survivorship.

*  Another great source of information is The Children’s Oncology Group’s Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers.  Talk to your doctor(s) about these guidelines.

 

*  Beyond The Cure has a very informative website that provides detailed information about the late effects of a cancer diagnosis and treatment involving all aspects of survivors’ lives. To help analyze late effects specific to your diagnosis and treatment, check out their Late Effects Assessment Tool.

*  My Heart Your Hands was created by 2 adult survivors of pediatric cancer.  Their mission is to not only raise awareness of the potential late effects of cancer treatments, but to also equip survivors with information and tools they need to manage their follow up care.  Check out their listing of Late Effects Clinics located throughout the US or listen to founder Stephanie Zimmerman’s story.

 

Remember, the more you know about the possible long-term effects, the better prepared you will be to meet any challenges the future may bring.

If you know of other survivorship resources that focus on late effects of cancer treatment, please post them below.  Knowledge is power.  Let’s share the power!  

 

(sources:  Natl Cancer Institute; The STAR Program; WSJ.com)

Applying for Social Security Disability Benefits with Cancer

 

Meet GUEST BLOGGER Ram Meyyappan. Ram is the senior editor and manager of the Social Security Disability Help website.  Social Security Disability Help contains information on how to apply for disability with over 400 conditions, helpful tips, FAQs along with an extensive disability glossary.

 

If you are a parent suffering from any type of cancer, the condition or the effects of the treatments you are undergoing may make it difficult to take care of your kids, let alone returning to work. In such cases, financial assistance may be available through one of the two Social Security Disability programs. There are two disability programs available to those who qualify under the SSA’s disability criteria. These include the SSI (Supplemental Security Income) program and the SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) program.

SSI

SSI is a needs-based program. In order to be eligible, you must be deemed disabled by the Social Security Administration and you must meet certain financial criteria. As of 2013, to qualify for SSI, you must not earn more than $710 as an individual or $1,060 as a couple. You must also not have assets that exceed $2,000 as an individual or $3,000 as a couple.

SSDI

Unlike SSI, SSDI is not a needs-based program. There are no financial criteria to meet. You must, however, have earned enough work credits through your previous work history. In order to have enough work credits to qualify for SSDI, you must have worked five of the past ten years. If you are not old enough to have worked five of the past ten years, you need to have worked half of the time you were able to do so.

Cancer and Meeting the Medical Requirements

The SSA uses a manual called “the blue book” to evaluate whether or not a condition qualifies for disability benefits. Cancer is covered in Section 13 of the SSA’s blue book under Malignant Neoplastic Diseases. Just being diagnosed with cancer alone does not mean that you will qualify for benefits unless it is a type of cancer that is listed in the compassionate allowances program. In most cases, the cancer has to be inoperable, have distant metastases (has spread), or be recurrent after surgical procedures or irradiation.

You will need to prove through your medical records and work history that your cancer prevents you from working at the job at which you were previously working or any other job for which you are qualified.

Qualifying Under the Compassionate Allowances Program

Certain types of cancer can qualify for Social Security Disability benefits in less than two weeks under the SSA’s Compassionate Allowances program. Under this program, individuals who are suffering from very severe conditions can bypass the standard disability claim process and be approved for benefits a lot faster. You will need a physician’s opinion stating that the cancer is not operable or an operative note stating that the cancer was not completely resected in order to qualify under this program. If an operative note is not available, a pathology report indicating positive margins can be used. When applying for benefits, make sure you include this medical documentation and make it clear how you qualify for benefits under the Compassionate Allowances guidelines.

There are numerous cancers that are listed in the compassionate allowance program. For a complete list of all compassionate allowances conditions, please visit: http://www.disability-benefits-help.org/compassionate-allowances.

How to Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits

You can apply for Social Security Disability benefits online or in person at your local Social Security office. Make sure that you have all of the medical evidence that you will need at the time of your application. While the SSA will have you fill out forms that allow them to request copies of your medical records, it is always best to submit medical records on your own as a part of your application to ensure that the SSA receives complete documentation that supports your disability claim.

FREE Kit to Help Manage Side Effects from Chemotherapy

A sample of an Adult Comfort Kit

A sample of an Adult Comfort Kit

We all need a little love once in a while… and if you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and are receiving chemotherapy, you deserve a little extra lovin’. That’s what Peppermint & Ginger Comfort Kits are all about…

 

Peppermint & Ginger Comfort Kits are FREE kits created to help provide comfort and help alleviate some of the more common side effects caused by chemotherapy.  An “Adult Kit” contains peppermint and ginger teas (which can help ease nausea), a soft bristle toothbrush, alcohol free mouth wash and toothpaste and lip balm (to help ease oral side effects experienced as a result of treatment), warm socks and a relaxation CD.  When possible, P&G adds in other goodies as well.  Their “Pediatric Kit” contains hot chocolate instead of teas and it’s contents will vary depending on the age of the patient.

 

If you know of a cancer patient receiving chemotherapy or if you yourself are a patient and would like one of these comforting kits, please click HERE to request one.

FREE Wigs for Cancer Patients Living in Des Moines, Iowa

 

If you live in Des Moines, Iowa and have lost your hair as a result of cancer treatments, check out Strands of Strength.  Strands of Strength provides FREE quality wigs to cancer patients- men, women or children- regardless of age or type of cancer – who live in Des Moines, Iowa and who could not otherwise afford a wig.

 

Here’s the dealio (as my daughter always says)…  

Strands of Strength works closely with medical professionals at Iowa HealthBlank Children’s Hospital and Mercy Hospital.   These hospitals will provide patients in need a voucher slip for a free wig.  

Patients can then choose any wig they like from any Strands of Strength-approved wig shop.  The voucher represents payment to the shop.  It’s as simple as that.

For more information, visit StrandsofStrength.com or contact Deb at deb@strandsofstrength.com or via phone at (515) 240-5843.

 

Reliable, Relevant Cancer Info Delivered Straight to Your Inbox

 

When first diagnosed with cancer, most people turn to the internet in hopes of finding information to better understand their diagnosis and research options for treatment. But finding reliable, relevant information is no easy task. And when you do find such information, it is often challenging and confusing to understand unless you have a medical degree or PhD.

 

If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with breast cancer, colon cancer or prostate cancer (or a few other health conditions like diabetes), check out Medivizor. Medivizor offers personalized information and updates for people with serious medical conditions. It’s like a google alert but much better. They will be adding more conditions soon- melanoma will soon be launched.

Here’s how it works….

1. Go to Medivizor.com to sign up- all you need is an email address and a diagnosis. BTW, any personal information you provide is not shared without your explicit permission. If you like, even your actual identity does not need to be shared.

2. Because Medivizor recently launched, they only support a limited number of conditions (breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, diabetes + a few others).  So at this point in time, after you sign up, Medivizor will confirm with you via email whether they support your condition of interest.

3. If they support your condition, you will then be asked to fill out a brief questionnaire. The more information you provide, the more specific and relevant their findings will be.

4. Next you will begin receiving notifications every few days via email on cutting-edge research, possible treatments, clinical trials and more relevant to your specific condition.  BTW, you can list more than one condition if you like.  You can also rate each notification or article in terms of it’s relevance to you.  The Medivizor search engine is smart and will tailor it’s findings based on your feedback.

5. And here’s my favorite part… the information you receive has been re-written in plain English. No medical degree or PhD required to comprehend the articles.  Medivizor even bottomline’s the information for you… literally.  See a sample article format below.  Also included is a link to the actual study which you can print out and bring to your doctor.

6. Lastly, Medivizor‘s personalized information updates is free of charge although over time, they may introduce additional services with associated costs.  Got questions? Contact Medivizor @ info@medivizor.com.

SAMPLE ARTICLE I RECEIVED ABOUT COLON CANCER:

Do elderly or younger patients with stage II colon cancer benefit from adding Oxaliplatin to adjuvant chemotherapy?

In a nutshell
This study tested whether chemotherapy after surgery (‘adjuvant chemotherapy’) including Oxaliplatin and FL (altogether called FOLFOX4) has any benefits in stage II and in elderly patients with colon cancer (CC). The main finding was that the addition of Oxaliplatin to FL as adjuvant chemotherapy did not provide any survival benefit in stage II CC and elderly patients

Some background
Stage II colon cancer (cancer in the large intestine) is confined to the digestive tract. It is usually treated with surgery (removal of the cancer). Adjuvant chemotherapy with Fluorouracil(FU)/Leucovorin(LV) (FL)  or Capecitabine alone is standard treatment for stage III CC (cancer that has spread from the colon to the lymph nodes). Oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) is a new FDA approved drug for the treatment of advanced colon cancer. Whether adjuvant chemotherapy has any benefits in stage II and in elderly CC patients remains inconclusive.

Methods & findings
899 patients with stage II CC participated in this study. 315 of them were ages 70-75 years. 569 were regarded as ‘high-risk’ (their tumors had certain features suggesting aggressiveness) whereas 330 were considered as ‘low-risk’. After complete removal of the cancer patients were randomly given either FL or FOLFOX4. Patients were followed-up for 5-7 years. The effect of Oxaliplatin-fortified adjuvant chemotherapy on the following indices was evaluated: Cancer-free survival (the percentage of patients alive without signs and symptoms of the cancer after a specified duration of time); Time to recurrence (time interval until the cancer reappears); Overall survival (the percentage of patients alive with or without the disease).
The addition of Oxaliplatin to adjuvant chemotherapy resulted in higher Cancer-free survival rates and lengthened Time to recurrence in all patients with stage II CC, and particularly in high-risk ones (28% and 38% rise, respectively). The advantage was minor in elderly patients. Either way, the benefit was not statistically significant. Overall survival rate did not improve at all under FOLFOX4 treatment.

The bottom line
In conclusion, the authors did not find a significant benefit from adding Oxaliplatin to FL as adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II CC and elderly patients.

 

My bottom line… The more knowledgeable a patient, the easier it is to advocate, and patients who advocate for themselves tend to have better outcomes.  Medivizor can help make you even MORE knowledgeable about your cancer.  So check it out and tell me what YOU think of this FREE service.  I can’t wait till they add sarcoma to their list of conditions. ;-)

Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Finder

cancer-and-immune-system1

 

Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that boosts the immune system’s fighting defenses to help the body destroy cancer cells.  Many clinical trials testing new and potentially promising “immunotherapies” are currently enrolling cancer patients in the United States and abroad.  To learn more about immunotherapy clinical trials or to find a trial that might be right for you, check out The Cancer Research Institute’s Clinical Trial Finder.  Here’s how it works:

 

  1. Select a cancer type.*
  2. Fill out CRI’s simple request form.
  3. Within 3 business days, you will be emailed a list of trials that you may be eligible for.
  4. Take the results to your doctor to discuss; contact the clinical trial sites/research teams directly; and/or contact the Clinical Trial Institute at clinicaltrials@cancerresearch.org for more information or for help interpreting your results.

* Current cancer types include:  Brain CancerBreast CancerCervical and HPV-Related CancersColorectal CancerLeukemiaLiver CancerLung CancerLymphomaMelanomaMyelomaOvarian CancerPancreatic CancerProstate CancerSarcoma and Bone CancersStomach Cancer.

If your cancer type is not listed, send an email to clinicaltrials@cancerresearch.org with information about your cancer type, stage and treatment history, as well as your location.  They see if there are any matches.