Archive for TYPE OF CANCER

Soy for Lung Cancer: 2 Tofu Recipes to Potentially Help Inhibit Malignant Growth

Soy

Meet GUEST BLOGGER Faith Franz.  Faith is a writer for The Mesothelioma Center, an organization that provides support and resources for people and families with this rare disease.  Faith also likes to spread the word about the benefits of alternative medicine.

Tofu –it’s what’s for dinner. (If you’re trying to naturally prevent lung cancer growth, that is.)

In a recent 2013 article, researchers from the University of Arkansas found that soybeans with a high oleic acid content could inhibit the growth of several cancers by up to 70 percent. Among the malignancies:

  • Lung cancer (growth reduced by 68%)*
  • Colon cancer (growth reduced  by 73%)*
  • Liver cancer (growth reduced by 70%)*

This was certainly not the first study to identify anti-cancer benefits in soy. Other studies exploring the correlation between soy and lung cancer date back to 1985, and one published this month indicates high-soy diets may correlate with longer cancer survival rates. (That study found that women who ate more than 21 grams of soy protein per day were more likely to reach five-year survival after a lung cancer diagnosis.)*

However, this study was the first note these specific bioactive benefits in three individual soy protein isolates. The University of Arkansas was also the first organization to identify two of the three high-oleic acid soybean varieties, as part of an ongoing soybean breeding program.

Oleic acid – the main fat component in the much-acclaimed olive oil – is also associated with breast cancer inhibition.

Lab workers tested each of the soy isolates against cell lines from lung, colon and liver cancer samples. They found that growth for each type of cancer significantly slowed after exposure to the soy isolates, and that higher doses produced greater results.

Several other food-derived compounds offer lung cancer inhibitory benefits. These include reservatrol, an antioxidant in red wine, and curcumin, the main component of the Indian herb turmeric.

Tofu, Two Ways

Tofu has a bad reputation as a bland, oddly textured food. But when prepared correctly, nothing can be further from the truth.

Just like you wouldn’t serve raw, unseasoned meat, you can’t serve raw, unseasoned tofu. It needs a zesty marinade and some added fat to taste its best.  It also needs to be pressed to remove excess water; without pressing, it’ll be soggy, no matter how long you cook it.

You’ll need to be sure to purchase tofu that’s certified organic or made from non-genetically modified soybeans. (The health effects of genetically modified foods are not completely known, but what we do know suggests that they’re not ideal for health). While the study uses soybeans that are bred to have higher-than-average oleic acid concentrations, there are several natural ways to breed non-modified high-oleic acid soybeans.

The following two soy-based recipes are full of plant-based protein (more than 15 grams per serving):

Crispy Baked Garlic Tofu (serves one)

Ingredients:

1/3 package organic tofu

1 whole egg

1/3 cup Panko breadcrumbs

1 tablespoon garlic paste

1 teaspoon onion powder

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon thyme

Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

-  Thinly slice tofu; press between paper towels for five minutes to remove moisture.

- Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

- In one bowl, whip together the egg and garlic paste. In another bowl, blend together the Panko, onion, cayenne, thyme, salt and pepper.

- Dip each tofu slice into the egg mixture, then roll in Panko coating. Arrange on a greased cookie sheet, then bake 10-13 minutes until crispy). Serve warm.

Easy Tofu Stir Fry (serves one)

Ingredients:

1/3 package organic tofu

1 floret fresh broccoli

½ cup sliced carrots

½ onion

1 can baby corn or water chestnuts

¼ cup organic soybean oil

Teriyaki sauce and soy sauce, to taste

1 serving brown rice or soba noodles

Directions:

-  Cut tofu into cubes; press between paper towels for five minutes to remove moisture.

-Cook rice/noodles according to package.

- Add vegetables, oil, teriyaki sauce and soy sauce to a wok (or skillet). Sautee for 5 minutes; add tofu cubes. Sautee another 4-6 minutes, flipping the cubes so each side gets firm and brown.

If desired, add another dash of teriyaki or soy; serve over the rice or soba noodles.

Do you cook with soy? If so, what are your favorite tofu or tempeh recipes? If you try out either of these recipes, let us know your thoughts in the comments.

 

*Sources:

Seaman, A. M. (26 March 2013). Soy tied to better lung cancer survival among women. Reuters. 

Rayaprolu, S. J., Hettiarachchy, N. S., Chen, P., Kannan, A., & Mauromostakos A. (2013). Peptides derived from high oleic acid soybean meal inhibit colon, liver and lung cancer cell growth. Food Research International; 50 (1).

Adult Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: Get the 411 on Late Effects of Cancer Treatments

 

Thanks to advances in early detection and better treatment regimens, survivors of childhood cancers often go on to live full and productive lives.  However, the same treatments that cure cancer can also put survivors at risk for future medical problems.  Such health problems, known as “late effects“, can occur months or years or even decades after successful treatment has ended.   

FACT:  In a large study of adult survivors of childhood cancer, researchers have found that more than 95% suffered from a chronic health condition by the age of 45, including pulmonary, hearing, cardiac and other problems related either to their cancer or the cancer treatment.

FACT:  The chances of having late effects increases over time so the older you get, the more likely you are to experience health problems.  Risk factors vary depending type of cancer originally treated, location & size of tumor(s), treatment regimens utilized as well as other patient-related factors.

FACT:  Survivors need proactive, clinical health screenings and ongoing, specialized follow up care. Regular follow-up by health professionals who are experts in finding and treating late effects is key.  The exams should be done by a health professional who is both familiar with the survivor’s risk for late effects and can recognize the early signs of late effects.

 

If you are an adult survivor of pediatric cancer, take a look at these RESOURCES that focus on late effects of cancer treatments:  

* Survivors Taking Action & Responsibility (STAR) program at the Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University is a comprehensive long-term follow-up program specifically created for adult survivors of pediatric cancer.   STAR is one of several programs in the country to offer this specialized service.  Here, annual check ups are tailored to each patient and may include a heart ultrasound, a battery of blood tests, a mammogram, a chest MRI, a session with a counselor as well as many other diagnostic tools.

I also LOVE their GET EMPOWERED: A video education series for childhood cancer patients and survivors.  Topics include the impact of childhood cancer on adult survivors, making the transition to adult health care, cardiac risk factors, fertility, finding a “new normal” and navigating the emotional side of survivorship.

*  Another great source of information is The Children’s Oncology Group’s Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers.  Talk to your doctor(s) about these guidelines.

 

*  Beyond The Cure has a very informative website that provides detailed information about the late effects of a cancer diagnosis and treatment involving all aspects of survivors’ lives. To help analyze late effects specific to your diagnosis and treatment, check out their Late Effects Assessment Tool.

*  My Heart Your Hands was created by 2 adult survivors of pediatric cancer.  Their mission is to not only raise awareness of the potential late effects of cancer treatments, but to also equip survivors with information and tools they need to manage their follow up care.  Check out their listing of Late Effects Clinics located throughout the US or listen to founder Stephanie Zimmerman’s story.

 

Remember, the more you know about the possible long-term effects, the better prepared you will be to meet any challenges the future may bring.

If you know of other survivorship resources that focus on late effects of cancer treatment, please post them below.  Knowledge is power.  Let’s share the power!  

 

(sources:  Natl Cancer Institute; The STAR Program; WSJ.com)

Coping With Mesothelioma: A Support Group for this Rare Cancer

Pic1

Meet GUEST BLOGGER Faith Franz.  Faith is a writer for The Mesothelioma Center, an organization that provides support and resources for people and families with this rare disease.  Faith also likes to spread the word about the benefits of alternative medicine.

If you were diagnosed with lung cancer, you wouldn’t take chemotherapy drugs that treat leukemia. If there were malignant tumors on your kidney, you wouldn’t have surgery on your ovaries. So why, if you were diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma, should you settle for a support group that’s not designed specifically for mesothelioma patients?

Until recently, patients with this rare cancer have had few specialized care options – on both the medical and the emotional side of the spectrum. But as more research goes into this asbestos-related malignancy, doctors and social workers alike are learning how to address mesothelioma’s unique challenges.

Take, for instance, The Mesothelioma Center’s virtual support group. Hosted by Dana Nolan, a licensed mental health counselor, this group focuses exclusively on mesothelioma-related topics. It’s designed to fill the gap left by general support groups (or the lung cancer groups that many patients turn to in the absence of a mesothelioma-specific network).

In this free, telephone/online support group, patients and their loved ones are guided through emotionally-loaded issues such as:

  • Deciding when to forego cisplatin, carboplatin and other mesothelioma drugs in favor of alternative treatments
  • Adjusting to reduced physical abilities (when symptoms like breathlessness and chest pain get in the way of everyday activities)
  • Overcoming the financial challenges of paying for treatment, traveling to national treatment centers and taking a leave of absence from work
  • Discussing worst-case scenarios, legal arrangements and end-of-life care directives with relatives

Patients can also connect with others who share their same diagnosis. While it may be difficult for them to find other mesothelioma patients in their city, they can combat feelings of isolation by reaching out to other patients across the nation and around the world. Here, fellow survivors can share the therapies that they’ve found successful, outline the side effects they’ve experienced and explain the coping techniques that have improved their lives.

The group serves as a safe, confidential place to give and receive valuable emotional support. Patients are free to share as much – or as little – of their personal lives as they’d like, and the moderator will make sure patients aren’t inundated with unsolicited advice.

If you’d like to register for the next session (The Mesothelioma Center hosts one each month), simply fill out the quick information form. You’ll receive a number to call and an access code to enter on the day of the meeting. Patient advocates are also available to help you through the simple registration process.

Applying for Social Security Disability Benefits with Cancer

 

Meet GUEST BLOGGER Ram Meyyappan. Ram is the senior editor and manager of the Social Security Disability Help website.  Social Security Disability Help contains information on how to apply for disability with over 400 conditions, helpful tips, FAQs along with an extensive disability glossary.

 

If you are a parent suffering from any type of cancer, the condition or the effects of the treatments you are undergoing may make it difficult to take care of your kids, let alone returning to work. In such cases, financial assistance may be available through one of the two Social Security Disability programs. There are two disability programs available to those who qualify under the SSA’s disability criteria. These include the SSI (Supplemental Security Income) program and the SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) program.

SSI

SSI is a needs-based program. In order to be eligible, you must be deemed disabled by the Social Security Administration and you must meet certain financial criteria. As of 2013, to qualify for SSI, you must not earn more than $710 as an individual or $1,060 as a couple. You must also not have assets that exceed $2,000 as an individual or $3,000 as a couple.

SSDI

Unlike SSI, SSDI is not a needs-based program. There are no financial criteria to meet. You must, however, have earned enough work credits through your previous work history. In order to have enough work credits to qualify for SSDI, you must have worked five of the past ten years. If you are not old enough to have worked five of the past ten years, you need to have worked half of the time you were able to do so.

Cancer and Meeting the Medical Requirements

The SSA uses a manual called “the blue book” to evaluate whether or not a condition qualifies for disability benefits. Cancer is covered in Section 13 of the SSA’s blue book under Malignant Neoplastic Diseases. Just being diagnosed with cancer alone does not mean that you will qualify for benefits unless it is a type of cancer that is listed in the compassionate allowances program. In most cases, the cancer has to be inoperable, have distant metastases (has spread), or be recurrent after surgical procedures or irradiation.

You will need to prove through your medical records and work history that your cancer prevents you from working at the job at which you were previously working or any other job for which you are qualified.

Qualifying Under the Compassionate Allowances Program

Certain types of cancer can qualify for Social Security Disability benefits in less than two weeks under the SSA’s Compassionate Allowances program. Under this program, individuals who are suffering from very severe conditions can bypass the standard disability claim process and be approved for benefits a lot faster. You will need a physician’s opinion stating that the cancer is not operable or an operative note stating that the cancer was not completely resected in order to qualify under this program. If an operative note is not available, a pathology report indicating positive margins can be used. When applying for benefits, make sure you include this medical documentation and make it clear how you qualify for benefits under the Compassionate Allowances guidelines.

There are numerous cancers that are listed in the compassionate allowance program. For a complete list of all compassionate allowances conditions, please visit: http://www.disability-benefits-help.org/compassionate-allowances.

How to Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits

You can apply for Social Security Disability benefits online or in person at your local Social Security office. Make sure that you have all of the medical evidence that you will need at the time of your application. While the SSA will have you fill out forms that allow them to request copies of your medical records, it is always best to submit medical records on your own as a part of your application to ensure that the SSA receives complete documentation that supports your disability claim.

If You’ve Been Touched By Breast Cancer & Are Planning A Wedding, Read On…

Image credit:  123RF Stock Photo

Image credit: 123RF Stock Photo

 

It’s that time of year again when The Wedding Pink presents one couple whose lives have been recently touched by breast cancer with a FREE dream wedding, valued between $30,000- $40,000.  OMG! So amazing!!

 

Founder Cheryl Ungar is a 22-year breast cancer survivor and a wedding photographer.  She has put together an extraordinary team of some of Colorado’s top wedding vendors — all of whom have generously agreed to donate their services and products to ensure The Wedding Pink is a spectacular event for one very special couple.

 

Here’s the dealio (as my daughter always says)…  If your life has been recently touched by breast cancer (fyi, the experience is not limited to the bride, but could be with the bride or groom’s extended family) AND are engaged or soon-to-be-engaged, you could be the lucky winner of this fairy tale wedding.

 

This year’s Wedding Pink will will take place May 15, 2014 in Larkspur, Colorado.  Applications are open to ANY legal resident of the US regardless of what state they live in.  Submissions will be open from August 15 – August 25.  The winning couple will be selected in early September 2013.  There are no income qualifications.  Winners will be chosen by a panel of judges.  To learn more about the submission criteria, click HERE.

Wishing you all a lifetime of health, love & happiness together….

Getting the 411 on Breast Reconstruction

7637119_s

The Cancer Support Community surveyed 762 breast cancer survivors (who were eligible for breast reconstruction) and found that 43% of these women did not receive any info about breast reconstruction PRIOR to making surgical decisions (mastectomy or lumpectomy).  Why is this a huge problem?  Well, if you opt to reconstruct one or both boobs, the method you choose to reconstruct can be affected depending on how the initial surgery is done.  Since you can’t go back and re-do your mastectomy, this is an extremely important conversation to have with your doctor BEFORE a mastectomy takes place.

 

Whether you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer or have a family history of breast cancer and/or the BRCA gene and are contemplating a mastectomy, check out BreastReconstruction.Org, the most comprehensive site on breast reconstruction that I’ve come across.

 

To provide a better understanding of the breast reconstruction process and the different options that exist, BreastReconstruction.Org has created a site that contains easy-to-understanddetailed information with illustrations and photographs on topics including: mastectomy; options for reconstruction; secondary procedures including nipple tattooing; pre and post operative care; as well as the latest news & information on reconstruction.  You can also read stories from other women who have walked in your shoes and learn from the decisions they have made.  It’s really a fantastic site.

 

BTW, my dear friend and kick-ass breast cancer survivor Diane Mapes (AKA @Double_Whammied) just wrote an incredible article on her breast reconstruction using the BRAVA/ fat transfer method.  To read about Diane’s experience, see her article “Reconstructing Hope.  Diane also blogs about breast cancer at www.doublewhammied.com.

 

 

 

 

Financial Assistance for Young Adult Cancer Survivors (Applications Due July 19)

logo

 

Common challenges facing many 20 & 30 year olds include paying off school loans, finding a job, securing health insurance and learning to live on their own.  These challenges are often compounded if there’s a history of cancer. When many young adults are finished with treatment, medical bills may have piled up, they are now too old to be on their parent’s insurance, and the debt starts spiraling out of control… but there’s help….

 

The SAM Fund provides financial assistance to young adults as they move forward with their lives after cancer.  Grants & scholarships can cover a wide range of post-treatment financial needs, including (but not limited to): current and residual medical bills, car and health insurance premiums, rent, utilities, tuition and loans, family-building expenses, gym memberships and transportation costs.  In 2011, SAM Fund awarded a total of $135,000 in grants and scholarships to 92 young adult survivors all over the country.  BTW, SAM Fund stands for Surviving And Moving Forward.  LOVE IT!

 

2013 Application Process is NOW OPEN.  Here’s how it works:

1.  Applicants must be between the ages of 17 and 39; a resident of the United States; and either finished with active treatment and free of cancer OR be one year following the completion of planned therapy OR be in remission on maintenance therapy.  If you have questions about eligibility, please email grants@thesamfund.org.

 

2.  Anyone interested in applying must first submit Part One of the application which is due by Friday, July 19th at 5:00 pm EST.  After a review period, selected applicants will then be invited to submit Part Two. Those applicants will be notified in November as to whether they have received a grant.

 

3.  Interested in learning more?

 

Champions Oncology & Sarcoma

 

I’ve had the pleasure of working with some of the organizations I write about in this blog; others I wish I had known about during our “cancer journey”; and still others, although not relevant to Alan’s cancer are fantastic resources that can help others in their fight against cancer.

 

Champions Oncology is one of the organizations that we were lucky to find. Their co-founder Dr. David Sidransky is one of the smartest and most dedicated cancer warriors I know. Champions is doing great work to help fight cancer… one person at a time. Watch this YouTube video above about a man who was diagnosed with sarcoma to learn more.  And click HERE to see what I wrote about Champions based on my personal experience.

Navigating A Diagnosis of Mesothelioma

mesothelioma-diagram-large-231x300

This post was written by guest blogger Tim Povtak.  Tim is a former newspaper reporter  who has been writing for The Mesothelioma Center since 2011.  The Mesothelioma Center provides incredible support and resources for people and families who need help understanding and coping with this disease.

Knowledge is key when it comes to battling malignant mesothelioma cancer. The more you know, the better you will feel about the fight. Not only is it tough to pronounce, it’s even tougher to understand all the intricacies involved.

Getting skilled help is crucial. It’s just not easy to do.

To help someone first diagnosed with mesothelioma, it’s vital to find the right resources – doctors and other medical professionals who see it regularly —  and a support group that is traveling the same route.

There is no replacement for experience.

Mesothelioma is a rare cancer – only 3,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the United States — caused almost exclusively by an exposure to asbestos, the naturally occurring mineral that was used extensively through much of the 20th century.

Reliable information can be difficult to find. Although there is no cure, recent curative advancements have been made. Novel therapies are being developed today. Alternative, supplemental remedies can help, too.

Selecting the right specialist might be the most important decision a patient will face. That’s where help, and support, is needed.

A typical diagnosis of mesothelioma may sound like a death sentence – six to 18 months was the norm not long ago – but many patients are surviving longer, and some even thriving, with the right help.

Rule No. 1: Don’t Do It Alone

As a caregiver, or just good friend, it’s important to learn about the disease. There is an easy-to-read encyclopedia of resources available at Asbestos.com.

The Mesothelioma Center helps patients and caregivers find the best doctors and the most appropriate cancer centers with the latest and greatest, most technologically advanced equipment. This is not the time to take short cuts.

At Asbestos.com, there are Patient Advocates who can advise patients and caregivers on where to turn, what to do next and how to connect with medical professionals. There is a registered nurse on staff to answer questions. There is a Veterans Department with counselors to answer questions that might be exclusive to veterans, helping navigate through the often-frustrating VA Health Care System.

Rule No. 2: Find a Support Group

There is a support group at Asbestos.com that meets the second Wednesday of each month at 8 p.m. EST. You can join in online or by phone. It’s moderated by a licensed mental health counselor and open to mesothelioma patients, families and caregivers who can ask questions, discuss concerns and chat on various topics.

There also is a Mesothelioma Facebook page, where ideas are exchanged and support is received. Also, check out the Wall of Hope, a section on mesothelioma survivors who have beaten the odds because they refused to concede to this terrible cancer.

Rule No. 3: Stay Positive

There is hope, so don’t believe all the gloom and doom. Explore the world of clinical trials. Mesothelioma treatment is changing. Gene therapy, immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy are the future, but they aren’t yet part of the traditional approach. They are available, though, through various clinical trials. Go to the National Cancer Institute website to see what is being offered.

Something could work. There is no universal therapy that works for everyone, but people respond differently to different treatments. Finding the right one sometimes takes the help of a friend.

Camps for Kids & Families Touched by Cancer

 

Attending one of the many camps created specifically for anyone touched by cancer can be a wonderful way to connect with others who share similar experiences.  While some camps are just for children (or young adults) who have been diagnosed with cancer or have survived a diagnosis of cancer; others are for their siblings; and still others are designed for the entire family to attend.  There are even camps for children who have lost a parent or sibling to cancer.  Creating new friendships, sharing adventures, mastering new skills or simply taking a break from cancer are a few of many benefits these camps can offer.

To find a camp that fits your specific needs, check out these incredible resources that list many different cancer camps.  Most camps have oncology doctors and nurses on staff to  provide medical care to campers when necessary.  Additionally, many of these camps are offered FREE of charge to participants.

Ped-Onc Resource Center which lists camps by state coupled with a short description of each camp.

Cancer.Net also provides a listing of different camp and retreat options for kids and families touched by cancer.

Allen’s Guide offers a listing a camps that specialize in oncology.

Also talk to your oncology nurse or social worker.  They may be able to suggest additional camps and/or retreats that may be beneficial for you.

If you’ve been to a camp that you loved, please comment below.  Knowledge is power… let’s share the power...

Switch to our mobile site